Brussels' political structures boost exclusion / by Kwinten Lambrecht

Brussels

You probably know the feeling: friends from abroad ask you to explain how the political system of Belgium and Brussels in particular work. "Well, in Brussels you have 19 different municipalities that own certain competences or share them with the 'central' Brussels regional government." Your friends look at you with raised eyebrows and then either start laughing or ask you how things can actually move forward here. And it's true; cities like Paris, London and even New York have one single Mayor, and a holistic approach to the way the city is planned and governed.

Brussels is different, it's a bureaucratic monster, things get done here but it takes an awful lot of time, 'thanks' to our political structure. Nowadays, the critical mass against these 19 municipalities 'fighting' with the central Brussels government is growing and there's a simple reason for that: citizens want to move forward. Citizens feel the potential of this great place, some politicians prefer status quo to protect themselves, and not their citizens.

After this long introduction I would like to come to the point: the political structures of Brussels pave the way for exclusion. Even better: participation encourages exclusion. The following example below illustrates why.

The alderwoman of cleanliness (or garbage?) of the municipality that I am living in, Ms. Karine Lalieux, organises every 3 months a 'rendez-vous' with people that are living in my neighbourhood to talk about cleanliness. Great initiative! But... as I am living on a regional street, the Alderwoman could not care less about my opinion. I am receiving this letter 'just for my information', since my street is not part of Madame Lalieux' action domain. How schizophrenic can your politicians be? In the heads of politicians these boundaries may be clear (because they want to stay in their luxury position), but citizens don't care whether a massive pile of garbage is being dumped on the corner of a regional or municipal street. Below you can find a Twitter conversation that happened last year, read and feel the kafka!

Karine Lalieux
Kwinten Lambrecht Twitter

Another striking example, without getting too 'dividing', but I want you to reflect on it: in Brussels we usually vote for politicians from our own language 'community'. This means that Dutch-speaking citizens vote for Dutch-speaking politicians and vice versa. In the end, this drives exclusion as well. Why? Because a politician like Fadila Laanan, who is the Regional Secretary of State for cleanliness, couldn't care less about my opinion because the chance that I will vote for her in the future, because I am Dutch-speaking, is nearly 0%. In reality I could of course vote for her, but that's the way Brussels' politicians reason nowadays. Just reflect on it: you are always in one or another way excluded.

We want our politicians to work at the service of the city, in the interest of the city and its citizens. So, let's stop accepting this madness. It will be more efficient, holistic, clearer and way cheaper!